Home / Malware / The fake hacking tool that turns the table on snoopers: 'Facebook Unlocker' app that claims to give you access to … – Daily Mail

The fake hacking tool that turns the table on snoopers: 'Facebook Unlocker' app that claims to give you access to … – Daily Mail

Wannabe hackers who try to break into Facebook accounts using a ready-made tool are in for a nasty surprise.

Facebook Unlocker promises to provide access to a target’s profile on the social network, but instead steals information that could be sold to criminals.

Although the app’s low budget appearance should be enough to deter anyone, warnings have been posted online for the benefit of anyone who is tempted try it.

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Wannabe hackers who try to break into Facebook accounts via a ready-made tool are in for a nasty surprise. Facebook Unlocker promises to provide access to a target's social media site, but instead steals personal information that could be sold to criminals on the dark web 

Wannabe hackers who try to break into Facebook accounts via a ready-made tool are in for a nasty surprise. Facebook Unlocker promises to provide access to a target's social media site, but instead steals personal information that could be sold to criminals on the dark web 

Wannabe hackers who try to break into Facebook accounts via a ready-made tool are in for a nasty surprise. Facebook Unlocker promises to provide access to a target’s social media site, but instead steals personal information that could be sold to criminals on the dark web 

FIVE STEPS TO MORE SECURE ONLINE OPERATIONS 

1) Enable two-factor authentication (2FA). Most major online services, from Amazon to Apple, today support 2FA. 

2) Encrypt your internet traffic. A virtual private network (VPN) service encrypts digital communications, making it hard for hackers to intercept them. 

3) Tighten up your password security. This is easier than it sounds, and the danger is real. Hackers often steal a login and password from one site and try to use it on others. 

4) Monitor your devices’ behind-the-scenes activities. Many computer programs and mobile apps keep running even when they are not actively in use. 

5) Never open hyperlinks or attachments in any emails that are suspicious.

Malicious software expert Malware Hunter was the first to sound the alarm, when he posted to Twitter.

The anonymous security researcher tweeted: ‘Another fake hacking tool for Facebook.

‘This time an “account unlocker”. When humans will stop believing in these obviously fake things?’

The fake hacking tool, which has been available in various forms since at least 2014, asks users for the profile URL of the target account.

To activate it, you must also provide an email address and phone number linked to your own Facebook account, as well as your password. 

Clicking the ‘make it rain’ button should run the hack, but instead it sends the information you have entered to an email address set up by hackers. 

This could be used to access your personal information on the site, including private pictures and correspondence.

It could also be used for the purposes of identify theft.

Malware Hunter later traced this particular version of the app to a hacker in Hungary.

The fake hacking (pictured) tool asks users for the profile URL of the target account. To activate it, you must also provide an email address and phone number linked to your own Facebook account, as well as your password

The fake hacking (pictured) tool asks users for the profile URL of the target account. To activate it, you must also provide an email address and phone number linked to your own Facebook account, as well as your password

The fake hacking (pictured) tool asks users for the profile URL of the target account. To activate it, you must also provide an email address and phone number linked to your own Facebook account, as well as your password

Activating the hack (pictured) sends the information you have entered to an email address set up by cyber criminals. This could be used to access your personal information on the Facebook, including private pictures or it could be used for the purposes of identify theft

Activating the hack (pictured) sends the information you have entered to an email address set up by cyber criminals. This could be used to access your personal information on the Facebook, including private pictures or it could be used for the purposes of identify theft

Activating the hack (pictured) sends the information you have entered to an email address set up by cyber criminals. This could be used to access your personal information on the Facebook, including private pictures or it could be used for the purposes of identify theft

Twitter users were largely unsympathetic to anyone caught out by the software, with many mocking victims.

Hapless Dark Star‏ said: ‘I kind of want to make one that all it does is post how stupid you were to your own Facebook account.’

Others suggest that the malware may be an adapted version of a piece of software called blackra1n, which is designed to ‘jailbreak’ the iPhone.

Cyber security expert Sec-7‏ added: ‘”Make it ra1n” I’m sure that’s associated with the “blackra1n” program for unlocking iphones. I wonder if it’s just a redesigned blackra1n.’


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